Susanna Wesley: Servant of God

Susanna Wesley: Servant of God by Sandy Dengler

I read this book in its entirety within the last few days. It’s a delightful read that will certainly challenge and encourage your faith. I believe if I had a better understanding of the Church of England in the 17th and 18th centuries, I would better understand the various sects of Christianity mentioned in the book. Either way, I still really enjoyed it and found it highly valuable.

Growing up Methodist, I knew Susanna Wesley to be the mother of John and Charles Wesley, who eventually started the Methodist and Wesleyan denominations we know of today. This book speaks of Susanna’s life, from age 13 until her death, at about age 73. Each chapter covers a pretty significant event and the entire book explains what we assume would have been her thoughts and feelings toward God throughout her lifetime.

The book actually makes a great book for discussing the difference between being saved by faith and being saved by works. The whole time reading this book, one thinks Susanna Wesley is already a Christian. However, toward the end, we read her coming to saving faith, with the help of her two sons John and Charles.

Beyond the theological aspects, I am amazed at her discipline in raising her children and in dealing with trails. It could also be viewed as a discussion book on how to raise children (or how not to). We see her very submissive to her husband despite their disagreements.

It’s nearly impossible to read the life of someone else without reflecting on your own life. I find myself now wondering what from her life I can learn in raising my own children. Adding this book to their reading list will definitely be one of those things I will do for my children!

I am giving this book a 4.5 out of 5. It’s a delightful read that’s fast and easy to get through, like a novel. Yet parts of it are kind of confusing to me. I greatly appreciated the timeline in the back. The book has also encouraged me to read more about church history and the protestant reformation.

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